FIXING CRAZY

There’s a certain amount of yearbook craziness we cannot fix. There’s the mayhem caused by rain days, internet outages, scheduling mix-ups, personality conflicts and unanswered requests that can cause your best laid plans to go awry and your stress to skyrocket. However, building a production schedule that creates predictability, stability and flexibility will help you maintain your sanity, minimize stress and maximize fun.

 

Gwen Childers // :28.49

ORGANIZING YOUR YEAR

The best way to allow maximum opportunity for your students to grow in yearbook is to set up the year early. Learn organizational strategies for putting together your ladder and deadline schedule, as well as helpful tips and tools to use as you go through the year to ensure you will never miss a deadline. Become a planning and organizing guru!

 

Angela Zuroeveste, Rocky Mountain HS // :32.18

DEADLINE PLANNING

Think ahead, gather school and event calendars, plot out the year and set your own deadlines that will beat your plant deadlines. Make your year stress free.

 

Teenie Reddeck // :22.26

INTRO TO TASK MANAGER

This overview of HJ Task Manager will provide examples of how and why a staff can benefit. When you finish with the “walk me” tutorials, you’ll be ready to use this powerful tool this year — and eager to get started early.

 

Teenie Reddeck // :10.36

eSHARE IS EASY

Crowdsource photographs to make sure you have images from as many people, as many classes, and as many activities as possible. It’s easy for non-staffers to submit photos for inclusion in the yearbook, you just need to let them know what and how you want them to help!

 

Kacie Kerkhof // :10.08

CHRONOLOGICAL LADDERS MATTER

Learn how creating/revising chronological ladder coverage encourages staff productivity and promotes plant deadline success. Collect tips/tricks and see some alternative coverage solutions. Not every yearbook is the same and nor should the ladders be!

 

Natalie White // :22.21

WORK FLOW THAT WORKS

When every student is a photographer and every week is a deadline, the production cycle becomes a win/win opportunity. With a plethora of photo choices, content naturally becomes stronger and more students get covered in the production process. In a day and age where a journalist cannot be a one-trick pony, this way of thinking provides students confidence and yet another skill set to add to their resumes.

 

Debra Klevens, Parkway West HS // :20.32

FOCUS ON FEEDBACK

Don’t make your staff wait until after deadlines for comments and assessment; that’s too late. Shorten the feedback loop with these ways to give in-process critiques and train the whole staff to provide actionable feedback during peer reviews.

 

Annie Gorenstein Falkenberg, Longmont HS // :33.16

This video expires on October 15, 2020.

YOU CALL THAT SPREAD DONE?

A staffer says the spread is done, but the editor says it not. Then, the editor says it’s done, but the adviser wants to throw a Chromebook. This session will help advisers and editors articulate their version of DONE. Learn three strategies that will help the whole staff understand expectations and work together to get things done.

 

Kara Petersen // :25.41

A SUCCESSFUL YEARBOOK TEAM IS LIKE A POTLUCK DINNER

Everyone has to bring something to the table. There may be assigned jobs and titles, but the reality is much of the work is done in collaborative teams. Goals need to be set, decisions need to be made, tasks need to be accomplished and everyone needs to contribute for your staff to create the best yearbook possible. Each individual has a choice: use your powers for good or evil? So, what is your secret power and how are you using it as a yearbook team member? How can you make the best contribution to your staff and can you identify your strengths? And, do you have any, ahem, habits or behaviors that might be less than helpful to the “teamwork makes the dream work” goal? Let’s get those out in the open and banish those behaviors for good! By the way — like most yearbook skills — this session will serve you well for the rest of your life!

 

Nancy Y. Smith, Lafayette HS // :45.17

COACHING YOUR TEAM - AMERICAN NINJA WARRIOR STYLE

Advisers and editors need to get students to do the work we need them to do, on-time and with spirit to spare. Find out how this veteran adviser re-imagined her leadership style and classroom procedures with the help of a competitive reality show to meet the changing needs of her staff.

 

Meghan Percival, McLean HS //:26.13

PLAYS WELL WITH OTHERS

Whether working with the surly veteran, know-it-all editor, protective reporter or overzealous publisher, knowing how to collaborate in the 21st century is vital to sustaining, maintaining and succeeding in the media marketplace. Join us in learning how to build a harmonious communications environment.

 

Michael Malcom-Bjorklund, Columbia HS // :34.38

BE THE EDITOR YOU WISH YOU HAD

When people talk about their favorite editors — and what made them great — motivation, organization and communication top the list.

 

Linda Puntney, Kansas State // :33.42

ITS WHO YOU KNOW

It takes a village. And, in yearbook, that means you’ll want to intentionally build strong relationships with others on campus who can simplify your work, approve requests and help you navigate challenges. Having support from the registrar and the guidance team as well as the athletics and activities departments makes so much sense. And don’t forget the faculty, administration and support staff!

 

Brett Riley // :33.28

STAFF INFECTION

Create the kind of infectious team morale you want and need to last through the deadline season. Your yearbook staff is more than a class, club, community or team. You’re journalists, a small business and PR for your school, your teams and clubs, and your community. Accomplishing all of that requires that you not only like each other, but support each other. Want to know how to create that kind of support? It all starts with you, the adviser and editors. Come and learn how to create an enthusiasm that spreads!

 

Natalie White // :20.04

YOU BE THE JUDGE - YEARBOOK STANDARDS

Guidelines that judges will follow in reviewing yearbooks for regional, state and national competitions are also helpful in maintaining usefulness and added value to your own publications over time. Prepare to think about the details that will give your publication that competitive edge with judges and with your readers.

 

Ray Slye // :38.53

MAKE IT FRIENDLY WITH READER AIDS - YEARBOOK STANDARDS

We’ll take a look at ways you can help your audience find what they’re looking for and navigate their yearbooks with ease. If your staff is unsure what content belongs on the endsheets, folio or division pages and in the colophon or how to organize your reference sections, this is the session!

 

Makena Busch, Mead HS //1:35.06

HELPFUL LINKS

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2020 YEARBOOK EXPO

Gwen Childers

gjchilders@herffjones